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Information on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

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Coronavirus COVID-19: Links You Can Trust

Coronavirus COVID-19 has been the subject of many recent news and social media reports. With the increase of fake and unreliable news, we suggest going to the following trusted sources to learn more about this topic.

World Health Organization (WHO)

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a trusted, authoritative source for public health information. The WHO announced the official name for the disease that is causing the 2020 outbreak of coronavirus disease: COVID-19.

  • Coronavirus (health topic)
    This landing page for the Coronaviruses family of viruses includes background, select news on the outbreak, and links to Questions and Answers on Coronaviruses.
  • Advice for the Public
    This WHO page on Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has practical information for dealing with the outbreak on a personal level. The page includes video, graphics, myth-busters, and even tips for coping with related stress.

MedlinePlus

MedlinePlus offers up-to-date information in language you can understand. MedlinePlus is a service of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the world’s largest medical library, which is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Associated Press

The Associated Press (AP) is a not-for-profit news cooperative that is widely considered the least biased reporting in the U.S.

Johns Hopkins University

If you’re interested in making hand sanitizer, click here for a link to a homemade recipe.

Informational comics about COVID-19

  • Comics for Good (Weiman Kow) is a website that publishes a new COVID-19 comic every week. Each includes an introduction to the coronavirus and comics on topics such as handwashing, masks, and staying at home. comicsforgood.com
  • COVID-19 Myths, Debunked (Whit Taylor and Allyson Shwed) tackles some of the misinformation around the coronavirus. thenib.com/covid-19-myths-debunked
  • The Side Eye: Viruses vs. Everyone (Toby Morris) explains how the virus spreads by looking at three levels: individual cells, individual people, and the global population.
  • Skating on Thin Ice (Robert Ullman) covers the cancelation of the Stanley Cup in 1918 due to the Spanish flu.
  • Hand Washing Like a Pro (Ellen Forney) turns hand washing into a fun story. wapo.st/3c6IEem
  • Graphic Medicine A collection of online COVID-19 comics as well as links to and reviews of graphic novels about the experience of illness. bit.ly/3ci26Fc

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